Entrance lintel and door jambs, a feature from the tomb of Khnumhotep II at Beni Hassan

Egypt, Beni Hassan, Khnumhotep II (Tomb 3), Upper Cemetery, Portico, East wall.

A doorway leading into the tomb’s chapel is located in the centre of the portico’s (or porch's) eastern wall. The doorway is framed by two jambs and a lintel, all projecting from the wall and inscribed with incised relief. The thickness of the doorway also bears two vertical lines of inscription, one on each side. All the inscriptions are in incised hieroglyphs. Due to the installation of a modern metal door, the original hole for a door pivot in the recess’ ceiling is not visible.

The lintel bears one vertical line and four horizontal lines of inscription (Entrance lintel). The inscription on the south jamb reads ḥtp dj nswt Jnpw tpj ḏw.f jmj wt nb tꜢ ḏsr dj.f prt-ḫrw t ḥnḳt n kꜢ n jrj-pꜤt ḥꜢtj-Ꜥ jmj-r smjwt jꜢbtjwt smꜢ Ḥr smꜢ PꜢḫt Nḥrj sꜢ ḥꜢtj-Ꜥ H̱nmw-ḥtp(.w) ms n BꜢḳt ‘an offering which the king gives (to) Anubis, who is on his hill, who is in the embalming place, lord of the sacred land, that he may give invocation offerings of bread and beer for the ka of the hereditary prince, the count, the overseer of the eastern deserts, the stolist of Horus, the stolist of Pakhet, Nehri’s son, the count, Khnumhotep, born to Baqet’. Below the inscription is a representation of the seated tomb owner in bas-relief. He is wearing a shoulder-length wig, a beard, a collar, a sash and short kilt with an apron. He sits on a chair with lions’ legs and a low, cushioned back and holds a staff in one hand and a folded cloth in the other. The inscription on the north jamb reads ḥtp dj nswt Wsjr nb Ḏdw nṯr ꜤꜢ nb Ꜣbḏw dj.f prt-ḫrw t ḥnḳt kꜢw Ꜣpdw pꜢwt n kꜢ n jmꜢḫ(jj) jrj-pꜤt ḥꜢtj-Ꜥ ḥrj-sštꜢ m pr-mḏꜢt ḫntj st-jb Ḥr ḥꜢtj-Ꜥ Nḥrj sꜢ H̱nmw-ḥtp(.w) ‘an offering which the king gives (to) Osiris lord of Busiris, the great god lord of Abydos, that he may give invocation offerings of bread, beer, oxen, fowl and cakes for the ka of the honoured one, the hereditary prince, the count, privy to the secret in the house of documents, foremost of affection of Horus, the count, Nehri’s son, Khnumhotep’. The text ends with a seated figure of the tomb owner similar to that on the opposite jamb (although here his right hand rests in his lap).

The inscription on the south thickness of the doorway reads mrw wꜢḥ tp tꜢ sbt r jmꜢḫ ḏd.sn prt-ḫrw t ḥnḳt kꜢw Ꜣpdw n kꜢ n ḥꜢtj-Ꜥ H̱nmw-ḥtp(.w) ‘Those who love enduring upon earth and attaining honour, they will say invocation offerings of bread, beer, oxen and fowl for the ka of the count, Khnumhotep’. The inscription on the north thickness of the doorway reads mrw Ꜥnḫ.sn msḏḏw mt ḏd.sn ḫꜢ m t ḥnḳt kꜢw Ꜣpdw n H̱nmw-ḥtp(.w) ‘Those who love their life and who hate death, they will say one thousand of bread, beer, oxen and fowl for Khnumhotep’.

Date
Middle Kingdom, Dynasty 12, Reign of Amenemhat II (c. 1918-1884 BCE).
Location
Egypt, Beni Hassan, Upper Cemetery, Khnumhotep II (Tomb 3), Portico, East wall, Middle section, Doorway.
Medium
Tracing paper.
Technique
Tracing.
Parent Context
Portico
Data Credits
Compiled by Penelope Blake and the Beni Hassan Research Group with resources from the Macquarie University Ancient Cultures Research Centre, and the Australian Centre for Egyptology.
Project Funding
Supported by the Australian Research Council Discovery Project scheme: DP160102223 "Measuring meaning in Egyptian art: A new approach to an intractable problem" held by N. Kanawati (MQ), L. Evans (MQ), A. Woods (MQ) and J. Kamrin (Met), the Macquarie University Department of Ancient History, and the Macquarie University Faculty of Arts.
Original Citation
N. Kanawati & L. Evans, Beni Hassan: Volume I: The Tomb of Khnumhotep II (Australian Centre for Egyptology: Reports 36, Aris and Phillips, Oxford, 2014, ISBN: 978-0-85668-846-1), 107, 108a-b (lineart).
Rights
Recorded and published with permission from the Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities. Photographs by Effy Alexakis as part of research on site. Copyright Macquarie University 2018. All rights reserved.
Cite this
Penelope Blake "Entrance lintel and door jambs, a feature from the tomb of Khnumhotep II at Beni Hassan ." In The Beni Hassan Visual Dictionary: Khnumhotep II, edited by Alexandra Woods, Brian Ballsun-Stanton, and Nicolle Leary. Sydney: Macquarie University, 2018. https://benihassan.com/dictionary/Khnumhotep+II+Tomb+3/Entrance+lintel+and+door+jambs/lineart/